Sam Maronies Entertainment Funhouse (Maronie Creative Services, LLC)
IT'S POP-CULTURE PARTY-TIME!

THE VAULT

October 19, 2013

BOOS IN THE NIGHT

drt

…SOMETHING VERY STRANGE GOING ON HERE…

Masks and makeup are as part of Hollywood as they are of Halloween. Here’s a collection of frightening faces from cinema and TV that will surprise many of you. Many have been seldom-seen by horror fans and are presented here for the first time….from the corny to the sublime—ENJOY!!

Looks like something out of a fevered dream, doesn't it? Actually it's a scene from The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T, direct from the mind of kindly Dr. Seuss! This 1953 film was produced by Stanley Kramer and  bombed big-time at it's release. It's only been in recent years that the movie has attained something like cult status.  (c) Columbia

Looks like something out of a fevered dream, doesn’t it? Actually it’s a scene from The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T, direct from the mind of kindly Dr. Seuss! This 1953 film was produced by Stanley Kramer and bombed big-time at it’s release. It’s only been in recent years that the movie has attained something like cult status. (c) Columbia

The messed-up face in this still is Mr. Boogedy (Howard Witt), a prank-playing ghost giving Mimi Kennedy a hair-raising scare. This ghoul comes courtesy surprisingly of the Disney folks from their 1987 TV film, Bride of Boogedy. (c) Disney

The messed-up face in this still is Mr. Boogedy (Howard Witt), a prank-playing ghost giving Mimi Kennedy a hair-raising scare. This ghoul comes courtesy surprisingly of the Disney folks from their 1987 TV film, Bride of Boogedy. (c) Disney

The Colossus of New York (1958) was an interesting sci-fi film about a scientist whose brain is transplanted into the indestructible body  of  a giant android. This movie has a stellar pedigree. The fine genre cast included Mala Powers, Otto Kruger, Ross Martin and Charles Herbert. It was directed by Eugene Lourie, who also helmed Gorgo, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms and The Giant Behemoth. William Alland, veteran of many fine Universal science fiction films of the 1950s, produced. Veteran spfx artist John Fulton created the camera trick work. (c) Paramount

The Colossus of New York (1958) was an interesting sci-fi film about a scientist whose brain is transplanted into the indestructible body of a giant android. This movie has a stellar pedigree. The fine genre cast included Mala Powers, Otto Kruger, Ross Martin and Charles Herbert. It was directed by Eugene Lourie, who also helmed Gorgo, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms and The Giant Behemoth. William Alland, veteran of many fine Universal science fiction films of the 1950s, produced. Veteran spfx artist John Fulton created the camera trick work. (c) Paramount

Not technically a monster, this interesting photo from 1968's Barbarella features the late John Phillip Law as a winged wonder. Of course, Jane Fonda from this era is always interesting to look at. (c) Paramount

Not technically a monster, this interesting photo from 1968’s Barbarella features the late John Phillip Law as a winged wonder. Of course, Jane Fonda from this era is always interesting to look at. (c) Paramount

The Gamma People (1954), was a weird sci-fi opus lensed in Germany. The feature starred Paul Douglas (in suit) as an American reporter who stumbles on to an evil experiment. Believe it or not, Douglas was a big star in the 1950s. He was certainly no Clark Gable, but somehow audiences responded to his rough-hewn exterior. He excelled at portraying gangsters, thugs, and other such knuckleheads. His best-known films are A Letter to Three Wives, the original Angels in the Outfield, and Joe MacBeth. (c) Columbia

The Gamma People (1954), was a weird sci-fi opus lensed in Germany. The feature starred Paul Douglas (in suit) as an American reporter who stumbles on to an evil experiment. Believe it or not, Douglas was a big star in the 1950s. He was certainly no Clark Gable, but somehow audiences responded to his rough-hewn exterior. He excelled at portraying gangsters, thugs, and other such knuckleheads. His best-known films are A Letter to Three Wives, the original Angels in the Outfield, and Joe MacBeth. (c) Columbia

Gorgo (1961) was Godzilla's illegitimate son. Another man-in-a-suit monster, the film was credibly made and featured some interesting miniature work. As entertaining as it was, this King Brothers production was no match for the slick Toho fare that was regularly imported to the USA. (c) MGM

Gorgo (1961) was Godzilla’s illegitimate son. Another man-in-a-suit monster, the film was credibly made and featured some interesting miniature work. As entertaining as it was, this King Brothers production was no match for the slick Toho fare that was regularly imported to the USA. (c) MGM

This slick remake of the original Children of the Damned left audiences flat. It starred Christopher Reeve and Kirstie Alley and was directed by John Carpenter. It couldn't hold up against the 1960 adaptation of John Wyndham's excellent novel. (c) Universal Studios

This slick remake of the original Children of the Damned left audiences flat. It starred Christopher Reeve and Kirstie Alley and was directed by John Carpenter. It couldn’t hold up against the 1960 adaptation of John Wyndham’s excellent novel. (c) Universal Studios

Mark Hamill stares down yet another hostile alien in a scene from the Dream Weaver episode of TVs seaQuest DSV. Where's Chewy when you need him? This series was produced by Steven Spielberg's company and ran on NBC for a couple of seasons. Viewers found it a crashing bore and the network kept it afloat solely on Spielberg's pedigree. Ah for the days of Admiral Nelson and Captain Crane! (c) Amblin/Universal Studios

Mark Hamill stares down yet another hostile alien in a scene from the Dream Weaver episode of TVs seaQuest DSV. Where’s Chewy when you need him? This series was produced by Steven Spielberg’s company and ran on NBC for a couple of seasons. Viewers found it a crashing bore and the network kept it afloat solely on Spielberg’s pedigree. Ah for the days of Admiral Nelson and Captain Crane! (c) Amblin/Universal Studios

 

 

 

 






0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


css.php